Legend Seeds Blog

This week, Legend Sales Agronomist Jeffrey Sorenson discusses emergence and issues to watch out for:

This week, Legend Sales Agronomist Jeffrey Sorenson explains the importance of understanding soybean platforms and using the correct flags.

This week, Matt Caron, Legend Sales Agronomist, discusses the benefits of using a pre-emergence herbicide:

Spring is here and seed delivery is in full swing. Many of you already have your seed and are working on a delivery plan to your customers. With that in mind, here are a few storage tips:

You’ve heard us raving over Envita™ for a while now.  Primarily applied in-furrow; though seed treatments and foliar applications have been successful.  Envita can colonize and live within the plant tissue of many plant species to help the plant fix and utilize nitrogen.  It is not limited to the roots or rhizosphere like many nitrogen fixing bacteria.  This is beneficial because Envita has a unique mode of action that allows the plant to better move nitrogen throughout the entire plant at a cellular level and therefore the nitrogen is much more efficient and plant available.

The excitement for spring is around us. At Legend Seeds, there are big things happening within our Research Team and our in-house research program, the Legend Elite Advancement Project (L.E.A.P). We are extra excited this year as we will be utilizing our newest investment, a Seed Research Equipment Solutions (SRES) planter. This SRES planter is an eight row planter which allows us to expand our plots and plant four rows of two hybrids at the same time.

Hybrid selection is one of the most critical decisions a grower can make for the success of their operation. A number of factors go into this decision that are related to environment, farming practices, weather, geography, and markets. All of these factors play a big part in narrowing down the hybrid selection choice.

Many areas within the corn belt experienced a wet growing season and, in some cases, there were many acres that did not get planted. Managing these “idle” acres is as important as managing an actual crop. Weed management is an important step in this process as we head into the upcoming growing season.

Many acres across the corn belt were too wet to plant in the spring of 2019. Because of this, the fields that were supposed to produce a row crop and possibly have a fertilizer application sat dormant and unproductive. Often when this happens, the following year’s crop can show signs of nutrient deficiency and reduced yield, even if that crop is planted in a timely fashion and has the full season to grow. This condition is known as Fallow Syndrome.

After an extremely wet season, such as 2019, it can be tempting for a grower to consider reducing the cost of pest control the following season in order to reduce overall costs. This may or may not be a good idea. Before reducing pest control costs, here are some factors a grower should consider.

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